Returning to Over The Edge on KPFA

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We will be returning to Over The Edge on KPFA for the first time in over 15 years on 30 November 2018, that’s starting midnight on Thursday night, California time.  You can tune in online, the show is 3 hours long.  https://kpfa.org/program/over-the-edge/

Since 1981, Negativland’s live mix, audio collage radio show, “Over The Edge,” has aired weekly for 3 hours at midnight, each Thursday on KPFA 94.1FM in Berkeley, California.  Mixed for 35 uninterrupted years by founder Don Joyce until his passing in 2015, the show continues on, now helmed by Wobbly (2nd & 4th Thursdays) and KROB (3rd Thursdays, as a frequently-broken rule).
 
OTE’s themed mixes are made live and spontaneously on the air from a variety of formats and equipment. There is a plan and there is no plan. The mix consists of found sound of many kinds and from many sources put together on the run as the continuous audio collage progresses.
 

The Mirror, PLU Doc + Q&A in Oslo

People Like Us will perform The Mirror at Kunstnernes hus on Saturday 10 November 2018.  It will be followed by a Q&A with Rob Young and then a screening of Nothing Can Turn Into A Void.
Tickets  Kunstnernes Hus, Wergelandsveien 17, NO-0167 Oslo

19.00-19.40: Live performance: The Mirror
19.45-20.15: Q&A with Rob Young, from The Wire
2015-2045: PAUSE
20.45-21.45: Documentary: Nothing Can Turn Into A Void- An Art Apart: People Like Us. By Carl Abrahamsson 

The Horror!! At The Horse Hospital

London’s Horse Hospital are very happy to present a double bill of horror themed content from People Like Us (aka Vicki Bennett) – legendary figure the field of sampling / appropriation and regular host on the Horse Hospital’s beloved WFMU, alongside Gwilly Edmondez known widely as the many faceted godfather of Wild Pop, founding member of Radioactive Sparrow and one half of YEAH YOU.  

Friday 26 October 2018, Doors 7pm
Admission: £7.50 in advance / £10 on the door

Tickets: https://www.wegottickets.com/event/452097

People Like Us Concert in Oviedo, Spain

PEOPLE LIKE US concert
Event: Noche Blanca
Date: Saturday, October 6th 2018
Venue: Teatro Filarmónica, Calle Mendizábal, 3, 33003
City: Oviedo, Spain
url: www.nocheblanca.es facebook: https://www.facebook.com/nocheblancaovd/ instagram: https://www.instagram.com/nocheblancaovd/
This audiovisual concert commemorates the 25th (well, at least!!) year of People Like Us publishing work, featuring highlighted excerpts from the previous four a/v performances of People Like Us.

Interview with Marta Barbón from LA NUEVA ESPAÑA (OVIEDO)

Translation: 

You were so young, only sixteen, when you got interested in “collage”. ¿What pushed you to get into that first experimentation?

I have always been inspired by music and moving image rather than non-time-based media.  The only education that I completed was a pre-degree art and design foundation course and I immediately was most interested in photography rather than drawing or sculpture, etc.  I was lucky enough to have a tutor there to lent me his books on performance art, conceptual art and photo collage, and through that I started working with footage and pictures as “found” objects rather than trying to capture something through a lens alone.

Are you aware that you get into cut&paste in a time and being part of a generation that wasn’t digital? In which ways could that circumstance have influenced your work?

What I do is folk art in the age of digital reproduction.  When I started it was in the age of analogue reproduction.  I couldn’t predict how fast things would develop around 2000 with the age of faster cheaper computing and broadband internet.  When I started it was still possible to do quite a lot with a cassette four track, hifi-based electronics and a scalpel and glue.  I couldn’t go back to that way of working now and I don’t romanticise it at all.  I always had a vision of what I am doing now but had to wait, and in some ways I’m still waiting.  For the past two years I’ve been making a 360 surround immerse audiovisual work called Gone, Gone Beyond.  This is only possible to do with the fast computer that I now have, but I still am looking ahead and forward, or rather my visions of what I could do next are. 

Do you think that for digital natives, collage, or the fragmentation of things, is something more natural, or there is no difference?

No, I think computers and also analogue copying (cassette, photocopier, printing press) are modelled around the human mind’s way of working.  We learn and improve ourselves by copying and improvising, by cutting and pasting in our own lives.  That is all that we have taught machines to do for us. 

Another fact that is related to your job, is that digital media caused an over documentation. Nowadays everything is filmed, photographed and saved. What implies for an artist that works with found footage?

That is true, but most of what is documented is pretty trivial, and the analogue version of that might be taking photos and leaving them in the wallet that you were given them in when they came back from the photo developers.  I think once again it’s to do with the way that we are, we like to document as a “witness” to us having been somewhere or done something.  This is why people used to like to photograph a landmark, or themselves in a landmark, it isn’t necessarily because they are going to ever look at that again but they want to take the snap shot to some how validate that they were there, possibly with the intention that they would share it in the future with someone, or just with themselves.  Although a lot of the time they never will.k

There are some authors that think that this over documentation cancel out, in some way, the “oblivion” and get us into “loop dynamics”, blocking progress or experimentation, especially in artistic languages. Do you agree with that? What do you think about it?

I agree that we all are in danger of repeating ourselves over and over again rather than being on a variable cycle of gradual/sudden change.  Although the latter happens naturally if we try and do the same thing over and over anyway.   

How much importance do you give to movements like Collaborative Art and DIY? Nowadays what role plays the authorship in contemporary art and what it means to be an artist?

I would rather that there were not “movements”, since they imply that something is in or out, or good and bad.  I understand the need to categorise in order to communicate faster but at the same time it can trivialise the subject matter then toss it onto the scrapheap once it’s been summed up.  DIY is very important, to learn through repetition is how we finally come up with something that makes sense to us, something that is more than the sum of the parts.  Authorship is limited once something is published.  You cannot put something out into the public and still have 100% control of it.

What could we see in Oviedo on this trip trough 25 years of “People Like Us”?

I’ve been publishing work since 1991 (so it’s more than 25 years now, in fact!) and decided to make an audiovisual concert compiled from a number of different works.  So it’s a whirlwind rollercoaster ride!

The Mirror on WFMU

People Like Us interview and movie screening
Friday 21 September 2018

2pm NY time
on WFMU online and on the radio in the NY area

Yes, it’s possible to do such a thing on WFMU!  The Mirror will screen in full in theatrical movie format on the front page of the WFMU.org website with simultaneous radio broadcast on Bryce’s Show on Friday 21 September 2018 at 2pm NY time.  The video will not be archived so you’ll need to view it there and then. http://www.wfmu.org/playlists/bk